Victories on Minimum Wage and Paid Sick Leave!

The fight for housing justice is not in a vacuum: There are many economic, social, and political forces at play when thinking about how to preserve our city’s affordable housing.  When a tenant is working a minimum wage job without sufficient benefits, how can that person sustain their family while paying over half their income towards rent?  In NYC, this is all exacerbated.  We live in an expensive city, and the housing market deals with huge influxes of wealthy gentrifiers who raise the value of housing constantly. It’s a mess!

Our very own Cea Weaver, the assistant-director of UHAB’s Organizing and Policy Department, was quoted yesterday in the Nation’s series on the first 100 days of Mayor de Blasio, touching on these very issues.  How can wages remain  low while the Rent Guidelines Board continues to raise rents on affordable housing year after year?

great if the RGB prioritized things beyond operating costs in determining increases. In the last few years rent has continued to climb while wages have stagnated, and the RGB should take that into account.

But as  the same article notes: rent doesn’t cause income inequality, income does. And higher income would make it infinitely easier for working class New Yorkers to afford sky-high rents. While national momentum to raise the minimum wage is high these days, it’s as hard as ever to pass anything legislatively in Washington.  For this reason, President Obama announced today that he will issue an executive order to raise federal worker’s salaries to adhere to a $10.10 minimum wage!

This will tangibly impact thousands of low-income workers, particularly those who work minimum wage jobs on army bases.  Over 600 economists recently signed on to a letter suggesting that a $10.10 minimum wage nationally will help the economy, as well as bring 5 million people out of poverty.  To support raising the minimum wage on a national scale to $10.10, sign this petition.

In other news, Newark will pass a law ensuring 5 sick days per year for all private- sector employees, including in food care, child care, and direct care services, industries that have historically been left out of some labor laws.  The paid sick leave trend is expanding: Newark is the eighth city to pass a this type of law, and many more bills are working their way through local legislative systems.  No one should have to choose between their health and their ability to pay their rent or support their family.  In one of their first moves at the helm of the City, Mayor Bill Del Blasio and Speaker Melissa Mark Vivierto announced their intention to expand New York’s paid sick leave law by requiring businesses with 5+ employees to provide sick days. While business owners fret, experience from other cities shows that paid sick leave bills work extremely well.

Paid sick leave and an increased minimum wage directly impact tenants we work with, and their ability to pay their rent, and remain healthy and employed. So let’s keep the momentum going on passing these progressive bills!

Finally, we wanted to give a quick shout-out to folk-legend and activist, Pete Seeger, who passed away on Monday.  His radical politics got him in trouble time and time again but never strayed from his values.

“My job,” he said in 2009, “is to show folks there’s a lot of good music in this world, and if used right it may help to save the planet.”

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